About this Site

This site will be the home of digital projects related to Shakespeare and the Holinshed Chronicles created by Dr. Andrew Wadoski’s ENGL 4723 class at Oklahoma State University.

In this project, we will create an online companion to Raphael Holinshed’s four volume edition of the Chronicles (1587) housed in the Library Special Collections archive. This companion will consist of a general overview and outline of Holinshed’s text along with more detailed presentations examining specific aspects of the text such as its background and production, its reception and influence, and the intellectual and political contexts within which it was produced and received. We will seek to create a supplement and online exhibit about this unique text and its relation to Shakespeare. We will use this project as a platform to situate both writers within the context and practices of the early modern study of history (i.e. before the modern disciplinary / professional model that we might find in a modern day university classroom develops in 18th – 20th century).

Header photo credit: Macbeth and Banquo encounter the witches–Holinshed. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

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Editing

The editing process was a lot to take in. Even though quite a few people were working together on editing the chronicles, it was difficult because the history that focused around Scotland and England was already ‘halfe written’. Apologies had been made in the text stating that there were limits on what they were able to achieve. The Oxford Handbook showed that Fleming stated that the Chronicles were ‘of unexpected magnitude by reason of the multitude of contents’ (18). John Hooker, An antiquary and chamberlain of Exeter who had previously lived in Ireland, was given the Irish index to work on by Fleming, but Hooker also worked on separate writings for the books as well. Hooker had been a member of the Irish Parliament in 1568-69, which made him well familiarize with Ireland. This made his contributions something to take note of. When Hooker arrived in Ireland in 1568, he was there to pursue territorial claims that belonged to Sir Peter Carew 1 . This gave Hooker a chance to represent himself as a New English settler of the 16th century who was in search of possible fortune, but if he did not represent that, his writings most certainly reflected that. Hooker’s edits in the second edition, however, are adjustments of the cultural identities. This makes a messy understanding of the English identity in Ireland but still shows that English culture had a very large impact on both sides of the Irish Sea.

The 1577 Chronicles shows struggle between the Protestant English and Catholic Irish. The writings show the differences between that of the English and the Irish, but there is a distinct and clear cut voice that reflects English Protestants. In 1587 you can see how Hooker’s adjustments are brought about. He called for a “reformation” of Ireland due to the way that Ireland had originally been depicted. Hooker was unable to achieve the reformation in the way he wanted though. Stanihurst, who was a pupil of a Protestant clergyman, noticed the differences between the English and Irish. He saw them as cultural and thought they could be reformable, but Hooker intended to naturalize the cultural differences. This caused contrast between Stanihurst’s and Hooker’s language in the way they chose to represent the Irish, in the 1587 edition. . Both the 1577 and 1587 editions had a goal to ‘teach personal ethics, and to foster a spirit of nationalism’, but with these struggles of representation, that way most likely obscured.

The 1577 Chronicles shows struggle between the Protestant English and Catholic Irish. The writings show the differences between that of the English and the Irish, but there is a distinct and clear cut voice that reflects English Protestants. In 1587 you can see how Hooker’s adjustments are brought about. He called for a “reformation” of Ireland due to the way that Ireland had originally been depicted. Hooker was unable to achieve the reformation in the way he wanted though. Stanihurst, who was a pupil of a Protestant clergyman, noticed the differences between the English and Irish. He saw them as cultural and thought they could be reformable, but Hooker intended to naturalize the cultural differences. This caused contrast between Stanihurst’s and Hooker’s language in the way they chose to represent the Irish, in the 1587 edition. . Both the 1577 and 1587 editions had a goal to ‘teach personal ethics, and to foster a spirit of nationalism’, but with these struggles of representation, that way most likely obscured.

The 1577 Chronicles shows struggle between the Protestant English and Catholic Irish. The writings show the differences between that of the English and the Irish, but there is a distinct and clear cut voice that reflects English Protestants. In 1587 you can see how Hooker’s adjustments are brought about. He called for a “reformation” of Ireland due to the way that Ireland had originally been depicted. Hooker was unable to achieve the reformation in the way he wanted though. Stanihurst, who was a pupil of a Protestant clergyman, noticed the differences between the English and Irish. He saw them as cultural and thought they could be reformable, but Hooker intended to naturalize the cultural differences. This caused contrast between Stanihurst’s and Hooker’s language in the way they chose to represent the Irish, in the 1587 edition. . Both the 1577 and 1587 editions had a goal to ‘teach personal ethics, and to foster a spirit of nationalism’, but with these struggles of representation, that way most likely obscured.

The 1577 Chronicles shows struggle between the Protestant English and Catholic Irish. The writings show the differences between that of the English and the Irish, but there is a distinct and clear cut voice that reflects English Protestants. In 1587 you can see how Hooker’s adjustments are brought about. He called for a “reformation” of Ireland due to the way that Ireland had originally been depicted. Hooker was unable to achieve the reformation in the way he wanted though. Stanihurst, who was a pupil of a Protestant clergyman, noticed the differences between the English and Irish. He saw them as cultural and thought they could be reformable, but Hooker intended to naturalize the cultural differences. This caused contrast between Stanihurst’s and Hooker’s language in the way they chose to represent the Irish, in the 1587 edition. . Both the 1577 and 1587 editions had a goal to ‘teach personal ethics, and to foster a spirit of nationalism’, but with these struggles of representation, that way most likely obscured.

The 1577 Chronicles shows struggle between the Protestant English and Catholic Irish. The writings show the differences between that of the English and the Irish, but there is a distinct and clear cut voice that reflects English Protestants. In 1587 you can see how Hooker’s adjustments are brought about. He called for a “reformation” of Ireland due to the way that Ireland had originally been depicted. Hooker was unable to achieve the reformation in the way he wanted though. Stanihurst, who was a pupil of a Protestant clergyman, noticed the differences between the English and Irish. He saw them as cultural and thought they could be reformable, but Hooker intended to naturalize the cultural differences. This caused contrast between Stanihurst’s and Hooker’s language in the way they chose to represent the Irish, in the 1587 edition. . Both the 1577 and 1587 editions had a goal to ‘teach personal ethics, and to foster a spirit of nationalism’, but with these struggles of representation, that way most likely obscured.

[1]Here is my footnote text. This is a lot of text about the subject. Back to text.

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